Scientology’s L. Ron Hubbard: A Legacy of Hate and Intolerance

The Scientology cult’s founder, L. Ron Hubbard, was a white American middle-class male who grew up in the early 20th century. It is not surprising, then, to learn that he was a racist and homophobe, and that there are many examples of these sentiments in his written and recorded works. What is surprising is that in the year 2008, the Scientology cult continues openly to embrace Hubbard’s extremely offensive statements, and refuses to make even the smallest gesture to repudiate or reject Hubbard’s hateful views.

Instead, in a tacit approval, Hubbard’s many books and recorded lectures in which these passages occur are re-published year after year after year, without any clarification, comment or footnote. Indeed, no individual Scientologist will personally reject these views, at least not in any public forum. To do so could earn him or her some time with the Rehabilitation Project Force (RPF), Scientology’s internal corrections and re-education system.

According to one of the thousands of Scientology web sites:

“The Scripture of the Scientology religion consists of the writings and recorded spoken words of L. Ron Hubbard on the subjects of Dianetics and Scientology. This Scripture includes more than half a million written pages, over 3,000 tape-recorded lectures and some 100 films….This Scripture is the sole source of all doctrine regarding the religion of Scientology and it is an inherent principle of the religion that only by exactly following the path it outlines can mankind achieve spiritual salvation. This concept of orthodoxy in religious practice is fundamental to Scientology. Thus, any attempt to alter or misrepresent the Scripture is regarded as a most severe breach of ecclesiastical ethics.”

Thus, it is simply not permitted to alter, modify, or update Hubbard’s work in any way (although the cult’s current leader, David Miscavige, has made many subtle changes). In fact, it is official policy that members must “exactly follow Hubbard’s path.” Still, even with the “scriptures” remaining relatively intact, this does not explain why the cult will not make a clear statement of its position on Hubbard’s extreme views, nor why it will not stop re-publishing them.

Here are a few examples of Hubbard’s views on people who did not fit into his scheme of things.

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